Registration and Schedule for ‘Remembering Jerusalem’ conference

Registration is now available for our conference ‘Remembering Jerusalem: Imagination, Memory, and the City’. You can register for the conference via Eventbrite.

The conference has been so popular that we unfortunately have very few places for non-presenting delegates. Please email the network administrator, Hannah Boast, before registering if you would like to attend and are not giving a paper.

The conference meal will take place on the 6th November at Tas Bloomsbury. It will include a selection of mezes, a main course, a half-bottle of wine per person (or soft drinks), and a small service charge, for a total of £33. You can reserve a place via the above Eventbrite link.

The draft schedule is available to download here. We are delighted with the enthusiastic response we had to the initial call for papers, and very much looking forward to what promise to be a varied and fascinating two days.

Demolition of conference presenter Dr Mutasem Adileh’s house, East Jerusalem

Dr Mutasem Adileh, of Al Quds University, has informed us that he will be unable to attend our November conference due to the demolition of his house by the Jerusalem municipality.

Dr Adileh is an ethnomusicologist, and was to present a paper at ‘Remembering Jerusalem: Imagination, Memory, and the City’ on Palestinian music and national identity.

The Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions and the Palestinian human rights organisation Al-Haq monitor Israel’s demolition of Palestinian homes. You can read more about this on their websites.

Ottoman Cosmopolitanism Masterclass on Transcultural Ottoman Memories, London, 29 November

The AHRC-funded Ottoman Cosmopolitanism network is hosting a masterclass for postgraduate and early career researchers on the topic of ‘Transmedial/Transcultural Memories: Points of Convergence’, which may be of interest to researchers working on Ottoman Jerusalem. The deadline for applications is 15 October, so get writing!

The following is reblogged from the Ottoman Cosmopolitanism blog:

Transmedial/Transcultural Memories: Points of Convergence

London, Saturday 29 November 2014

The Ottoman Cosmopolitanism Network is pleased to present a free half-day masterclass on the topic of transmedial/transcultural Ottoman memories for postgraduate students and early career researchers (who have completed their PhD for no more than 3 years), led by theorist of postmemory, Marianne Hirsch (Professor, Columbia University) and archivist/creator of aka Kurdistan, Susan Meiselas (Magnum photographer). The class will focus on the ways in which transcultural memories becomes crucially translated across various media, including trans-modal forms, e.g. in combination with websites and books, films and exhibitions. The class will also explore the nature of disputed memories and representations of particular attachments to land and place in spite of histories of trauma and exile. While not mandatory to attend, the second half of the day will be dedicated to performances by storytellers and cultural activists who practise differing creative modalities of articulating transcultural Ottoman memories.

Due to the interactive nature of the masterclass, there are only 25 positions available. In order to apply, please fill out the below application form. If accepted, you will be expected to produce of a poster (A4 size fine) which best represents your research and its relation to the central themes of the class. The poster (which will be shared in the class) must include (a) a maximum 300-word description of your current research and how it relates to the topic of the class, and (b) any kind of visual representation of your research: images, diagrams, etc. You may choose to include your poster as part of your application. Applications are encouraged from any field of discipline and do not need to be practice-based. Applicants should also be aware that there will be a small amount of required reading by Hirsch and Meiselas (which will be provided through email) before the class.

Click on the following link for the Ottoman Masterclass Application Form, which is due by 15 October 2014. For a pdf version, click here.

Exhibition and Conference on ‘Custody of the Holy Land’, Jerusalem, 23 October 2014

Monastery of St Saviour, via Wikipedia.

Readers in Jerusalem may be interested in an exhibition and conference on the topic of ‘Custody of the Holy Land’ which is taking place at St Saviour’s Monastery on 23rd October.

The exhibition, MFH Manuscripta Franciscana Hierosolymitana’, will feature a selection of manuscripts from the collection of The Library of the Custody of the Holy Land in Jerusalem, one of the libraries of the Franciscan Order. A digital catalogue of the over five hundred manuscripts in the entire collection is available online.

One of our network organisers, Dr Michele Campopiano (University of York) will deliver the conference keynote. It is entitled: ‘Writing the Holy Land: Manuscripts and Texts from the Franciscan Convent in Jerusalem (1333-1530 ca).’

Entrance to the exhibition and conference is free.

For more information, please use the following contact details:

Tel. +972 2 62 66 756 (Jerusalem); +39 0272342606 (Italy)

Email: bibliocts@custodia.org; creleb@unicatt.it

You can download the event poster here.

Bianca Kühnel: Jerusalem’s Imprint on the European Visual Memory, University of York, 11-12 November 2014

Eichstätt_IMG_1643You are invited to a public lecture and graduate seminar at the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of York, as part of the York Medieval Centre Series:

Jerusalem’s Imprint on the European Visual Memory

Bianca Kühnel (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

The lecture is an attempt to classify the manifold representations of Jerusalem in Christian medieval art and architecture, aiming to emphasize the turning points in their history. The dependence on one model, on one hand, and the broad geographical and historical distribution, on the other, have produced a unique artistic phenomenon that has yet to be deciphered in its complexity. The lecture will map some of the most representative Jerusalem sites in Europe in connection with the respective historical and political conditions of their foundation. The seminar will concentrate on a few test cases, asking if and how the local, particularistic features fit (or not) into the European network of Jerusalem representations.

Public Lecture, Tuesday 11 November 2014, 5.30pm, King’s Manor, K/133.

Graduate Seminar, Wednesday 12 November, 11.15am, King’s Manor, K/159.

The lecture is free and open to all. For the graduate seminar students should register their interest in attending by e-mailing Brittany Scowcroft (brittany.scowcroft@york.ac.uk).

Download the poster here.

Call for Papers: The Politics of Visual Translations of Jerusalem, History of Art, University of York, March 2015

The History of Art Department at the University of York is hosting a cross-period, interdisciplinary conference in March 2015 on ‘The Politics of Visual Translations of Jerusalem’. The Call for Papers is below, and you can download it as a PDF here.

Access to and sovereignty over the holy places of Jerusalem is a frequent source of political tension amongst the three Abrahamic faiths, while further discord has developed over the religious and secular identities of the city. There is no question that contemporary visualisations of Jerusalem are concerned with the political status and symbolism of Jerusalem as a divided city, disputed state capital and key issue for the peaceful resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. However, despite acknowledgment of the deep historical roots of contemporary political conflicts in the Middle East, the political significance of earlier visual translations of Jerusalem has often escaped scholarly attention. This conference aims to address this important issue. It seeks to look across different historical periods, geographical boundaries and religious traditions to bring out the range of political ideas and agendas which underpin architectural translations, visual representations and physical relics of Jerusalem in Europe and beyond. Considering the ways in which Jerusalem and its holy places were imagined, visually represented, and replicated across the medieval, early modern and modern periods, the conference will ask: What political interests or regimes have become invested in the recreation of Jerusalem? How have local or wider political events impacted on Jerusalem translations and their histories, for example with regard to iconoclasm and politically motivated acts of vandalism and destruction? As such, the conference will examine political dimensions in the construction, use, appropriation, and reception history of visual translations of Jerusalem, seeking to establish a productive scholarly dialogue between place, period and political agenda.

Keynote lectures will be given by Achim Timmermann (University of Michigan) and Antony Eastmond (Courtauld Institute).

Papers are invited from researchers in the fields of history of art and architecture, politics, history, literature, religion, archaeology, and other relevant disciplines. Areas of particular interest include:

Jerusalem recreations and the definition of nations, states, empires, cities and peoples

Political regimes: the recreation of Jerusalem at centres of power and within political territories; the importance of Jerusalem for the self or public image of rulers

Current events: the role of visual translations of Jerusalem in political debates, polemics, propaganda, and political movements; Jerusalem sites as places of political resistance or rebellion

The politics of performance, exhibition and consumption

The use or reuse of Jerusalem sites as memorials

The politics of loss: destruction or neglect of Jerusalem translations

Please send an abstract of up to 300 words to Laura Slater (jerusalemeuropeconference@gmail.com). Deadline for submission of proposals is 10 October 2014. Limited funding is available to help cover external speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses. Please let us know in your email if you require funding. The conference is organized in the context of the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/20072013)/ ERC grant agreement no.249466.

For further information see: https://www.york.ac.uk/historyofart/ visualtranslationsjerusalem/

Filming Israel/Palestine: The Honourable Woman

Hugo Blick’s The Honourable Woman (BBC2), starring Maggie Gyllenhaal as the would-be peacemaking heir to an Israeli family’s arms fortune, is a rare example of British TV taking on one of the riskiest subjects for a weeknight drama: the Israel-Palestine conflict.

I say risky, because Israeli and Palestinian history and politics aren’t subjects that are familiar to British audiences, and which will produce reliably high viewing figures – they’re not Nordic Noir or The Great British Bake Off.

Israel/Palestine is also perhaps the archetypal topic on which venturing a comment can lead to frenzied justifications, backtracking and speedy regrets, as reporters and many celebrities found during in a summer which saw Israel launch devastating attacks on the Gaza Strip during Operation Protective Edge. In a way, it’s surprising that The Honourable Woman made it onto our screens this summer at all, and wasn’t held back for a less volatile time – although perhaps someone made the calculation that it’s a show which might benefit from being topical (as it did).

Beyond news programmes, Peter Kosminsky’s Channel 4 drama The Promise (2011) has been the only recent UK programme to take on Israel/Palestine (although see our member Anna Bernard’s 2012 article ‘Consuming Palestine’ for a survey of Israel/Palestine in British theatre and American popular culture, where it’s more prominent).

So, while The Honourable Woman isn’t about our topic of Jerusalem as such, it’s worth thinking more about how it represented Israelis, Palestinians, and the conflict, given its level of influence, which will have been extended by viewers seeking deeper explanations for the recent increase in tension (and, I’d less charitably suggest, hoping to look clever in the pub).

Continue reading